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FAQs

What is the difference between tagging and graffiti?

In general, the term graffiti is used to describe the appearance of unauthorized words, colors, artwork, and shapes drawn, carved, painted, or etched into buildings, cars, signs, overpasses, bridges, and other surfaces. Tagging is a form of graffiti where the vandal quickly scrawls his initials or moniker on a surface, often repetitively.

How is graffiti removed?

It depends on the surface and how the graffiti was applied. While you may envision a tagger with a can of spray paint, a great deal of graffiti is applied using markers, blades, etching products, lipstick, shoe polish, and adhesives. Common surfaces include stucco walls, concrete, glass, rocks, bricks, aluminum siding, vinyl siding, metal, pavement, utility boxes, air conditioner coils, wood, and street signs. Depending on the material used and surface, an appropriate response could include power washing, paint remover, razor blades, chemical solvents, soda blasting, repainting, or other more drastic measures. In most cases, you'll need a professional to ensure that you don't cause additional damage.

Why is copper theft such a problem?

Scrap copper and other metals have seen dramatic price increases in recent years. As price rise, these metals have become increasingly attractive to thieves and transients. Scrap yards pay by the pound, making for a convenient and easy way to cash in on these metals.

How can I prevent vandalism?

While it's impossible to completely prevent vandalism, you can make your environment less appealing to vandals. For example, if your building is attractive to vandals because it has a parapet roof that blocks illegal activities from view, you'll want to make your rooftop less appealing. Installing better lighting, surveillance systems, and alarms could be an effective solution.

Why should I be concerned about vandalism?

There are many reasons to be concerned about vandalism including the cost to repair the damage as well as the affects vandalism has on the community at large. Vandalism breeds additional vandalism, so unless it's promptly taken care of, you could see even more acts.

Will my insurance company pay for loss of use as part of my commercial vandalism claim?

If you have business interruption or loss of use coverage and suffered some form of business interruption or loss of use related to the vandalism, it may be covered.

My insurance company wants me to sign a waiver. Should I?

Not until your public adjuster or attorney has looked it over and told you it's okay. The last thing you want to do is sign away your rights or agree to conditions that might affect the amount of your settlement.